CNBC's Mark Haines autopsy report released

CNBC stalwart morning host Mark Haines died suddenly at his home on the evening of May 25, at the age of 65.

UPDATE June 9, 2011 Monmouth County, New Jersey: An autopsy report dated June 8, 2011 was made public today, signed by Mark Haines' personal physician Dr. Eugeny Olenko of Forest Hills, N.J, according to David B. Durand, M.D. Durand spoke to the Monmouth County Medical Examiner's office and learned that Haines died of natural causes, namely congestive heart failure due to cardiomegaly. Dr. Durand's newsletter containing his report of the information, can be found here.

CNBC produced and aired a special sixty minute tribute to Haines the night after he died. A video of that special is embedded below. You can find the story about what "Squawk on the Street" will look like post-Haines and Erin Burnett, here. Original story follows.

Haines was a staple of the morning programming on NBC's financial news titan for more than 20 years and a founding anchor of the network's award winning signature show "Squawk Box".

Squawk Box gave way to "Morning Call" and then "Squawk on the Street" which he co-anchored with Erin Burnett, through early May 2011 when Burnett announced she was leaving CNBC for another position at competitor CNN. Read about the changes to both "Squawk" programs, here.

CNBC management issued a statement Wednesday morning shortly after receiving the news of their long-time anchor's death. Mark Hoffman, President of the network said:

"With his searing wit, profound insight and piercing interview style, he was a constant and trusted presence in business news for more than 20 years," Hoffman said in a statement to CNBC employees. "From the dotcom bubble to the tragic events of 9/11 to the depths of the financial crisis, Mark was always the unflappable pro.

"Mark loved CNBC and we loved him back. He will be deeply missed."

Haines' bio reveals that prior to his time at CNBC he served as a news anchor for KYW-TV in Philadelphia, WABC-TV in New York, and WPRI-TV in Providence, Haines joined CNBC in 1989. He held a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School and was a member of the New Jersey State Bar. In 2000, he was named to Brill’s Content’s "Influence List."

One of the hallmarks of Haines' style was his humor, even in the face of bad news that came in bunches during the dot-com bust and bank meltdown. His habit of giving nicknames to his on-air colleagues was a trademark. Some of those who were dubbed with a monicker were stuck with it forever when Wall Street traders and fans of "Squawk Box" started using the nicknames to the exclusion of formal names for the on-air talent.

David Faber became "The Brain," Joe Kernen was dubbed "The Kahuna" and Steve Liesman, "The Professor." Hoffman told media that, "If a colleague ever complained about it, he would respond, "What's worth more, your name or the nickname?"

Those same people handled the news while on the air. Some struggled to keep their composure more than others. They then began to reminisce with stories about Haines' style, and how he forged strong relationships with people at the network and on the Street. Traders at the NYSE stopped business for a moment of silence when the news was announced.

One of Haines' signature moments was his handling of anchor chores as the World Trade Center towers were attacked and fell on September 11, 2001. CNBC senior economics reporter Steve Liesman said Haines' performance on that day rivaled that of any top network news anchor.

CNBC's new rising star, Darren Rovell who covers the business of sports said about Haines, "He was our John Daly. He was your everyman."

Mark Haines reportedly died at his home on Tuesday. The cause of death has not been announced. He is survived by his wife Cindy and his children Matthew and Meredith.

Comments

Submitted by S. Aiello (not verified) on
I really feel so terrible about Mark. I have been watching him forever for all the reasons everyone has been talking about on Squawk Box and the CNBC financial station all day today. But what I really liked about him was the fact that he was always on my side. I felt so confident in his opinions because they were honest and he didn't take crap from anyone who would try to give him a line of B.S.. He had a tremendous pulse of what people need, want , are thinking and are feeling. This came across on the TV screen as honest. He was intelligent, articulate with a good sense of humor but most of all he was one of us. What a loss. My sincerest condolences and prayers to his family. Your pride in him should be overwhelming.

Submitted by Richard McGraw (not verified) on
Anchors and reporters will come to CNBC and leave for other positions with other Networks. I have been watching CNBC occasionally and daily since I retired over 3 years ago, Mr. Mark Haines was my favorite male anchor and obviously from what others more important than me said about him has confirmed why he was simply the best. Someone will replace him and also his co-anchor Erin Burnett, who were a great team, but it will take years before his memory fades. He had that humor with smirky smile and grin as he spoke with co-host and others on the air. He would not hesitate to interrupt and halt speculation about any subject. We (I) will miss you Mr. Mark Haines. R.I.P.

Submitted by wally martin (not verified) on
THANK YOU FOR BEING AN INSPRIRATION TO ME. I USED TO GET UP EARLY JUST TO WATCH YOU AND THE REST OF THE CNBC STAFF AND TO WAKE UP WITH A GOOD FEELING. YOU WERE LIKE A BOX OF CHOCOLATES, ONE OF MY FAVORITES, YOU NEVER KNEW WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO GET. BUT I ALWAYS LEFT THE HOUSE WITH A SMILE. ONE FUNNY STORY. I WAS IN THE SHOWER WITH THE TV SO LOUD WITH YOUR SHOW ON, THE NEIGHBOR CALLED THE POLICE ON ME. I FELT LIKE YOU ANSWERING THE DOOR IN MY SWEATS. MARK, THANK YOU FOR ALL THE GOOD MEMORIES AND BEING YOURSELF. MY CONDOLENCES TO YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF CNBC.