NY Med exposed personal side of trauma surgeon

Paula Duffy's picture

NY Med opened its second show of the eight-part documentary with an ER team working feverishly to revive a stabbing victim. Even the surgical resident marveled at how they managed to be successful

NY Med on ABC takes a look at the gritty and extraordinary work of surgeons at N.Y. Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Memhet Oz is included in the mix as fans of Dr. Oz learn about what he does when he's not hosting his daily talk show.

In the first week's series premiere, Dr. Oz lovingly cared for a heart patient and explained his philosophy about surrounding a patient with love and support, as a more important factor in recovery than all else. Read: NY Med reveals the other side of Dr. Oz.

In last night's show, we were introduced to and followed Chief Surgery Resident Sebastian Schubl. He wears a black surgical cap to honor and remember what happened to the city of New Orleans during and in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. New Orleans has a special place in his heart. He worked in a local hospital that got flooded and evacuated. He has been in N.Y. for three years.

Dr. Schubl spoke of his sadness leaving New Orleans as well as the personal upheaval that resulted in a divorce. His and his ex-wife had been together since they were teenagers but after 15 years it was over. As the program concluded, we see Dr. Schubl return to New Orleans for his first visit in two years.

He explained the profession of trauma surgery and emphasized that loving what you do is imperative to succeed when you choose trauma medicine as a specialty.

"If you don't absolutely love this job. If this isn't the only thing that you can see yourself doing please choose something else. There is not a day that has gone by when I have regretted making this choice "

Against the odds, the male stabbing wound patient without a blood pressure reading was able to be stabilized after a team of almost a dozen people worked feverishly to accomplish the task. Dr. Schubl explained the lure of the profession despite the odds.

"There is a little bit of a gift in trauma, that you are dealing with a patient who might very well already be dying or dead when you get to him. From that point forward anything you do is going to be an improvement." Apparently the adrenaline rush and pride in the profession intersects in the ER, for the good of all. Read about the latest episode of NY Med, with a heart transplant patient who is also HIV positive.

Who else came in the door?

Leaking aneurysm: An elderly woman with a leaking aortic aneurysm came into the ER as a transfer from another hospital. She had a pulse and a cranky nature. As she was being examined, she resisted having a circle of onlookers watch as she was undressed.

Resident Ben van Boxtel chuckled a bit. "This perfectly illustrates the spectrum of aortic aneurysms. You can be unstable and getting chest compressions or cracking jokes. She appears to be very stable," he remarked as the patient then screamed at the camera operator to get the heck out.

Injured and intoxicated patients
: Some arrived highly inebriated after celebrating St. Patrick's Day with injuries sustained in brawls or accidents. One man was bleeding from a gash on his head and resisted being admitted. He was still drunk but made a break for the door when he could. He was corralled by EMTs and needed a stern warning from a doctor.

Non-emergency surgical patients
: Dr. Schubl and his attending physician boss removed a mass from the colon of a 25 year-old woman with no real medical issues. Even after removal they were unable to say precisely what it was but one thing was certain, it was a benign mass.

Mr. Jon Kuhfeldt and his family arrived when they learned that a liver he was waiting for became available and he was prepped for surgery the same night.

NY Med airs new episodes on ABC, Tuesday nights at 10:00 p.m. ET. For more information on the documentary series and the physicians featured in the episodes, go to the show's website, here.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
The surgeon was NOT an ER physician and is not affiliated with the specialty of emergency medicine. Doctors specializing in emergency medicine are ER docs and do NOT go to the OR and do surgery. When Dr. Schubl was discussing "loving what you do" he was discussing trauma surgery (or just plain surgery even) not emergency medicine. Editor please correct these errors, it is difficult enough already for people to understand the role of the trauma surgeon vs. ER doc.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
The surgeon was NOT an ER physician and is not affiliated with the specialty of emergency medicine. Doctors specializing in emergency medicine are ER docs and do NOT go to the OR and do surgery. When Dr. Schubl was discussing "loving what you do" he was discussing trauma surgery (or just plain surgery even) not emergency medicine. Editor please correct these errors, it is difficult enough already for people to understand the role of the trauma surgeon vs. ER doc.

Submitted by PaulM (not verified) on
My coworker at Dish said that this is a very touching series but that was just scratching the surface. I have never had the opportunity to spend a prolonged period of time in a hospital so the topics discussed in this show are a little new to me. I am not sure what the difference is between an ER physician and an ER doctor but what I do know is that those people made a difference. The stab wound victim on the show that had his life saved, really had his life saved. That really happened. It gives me an entirely new respect for what goes on inside a hospital. I was watching a few fictional medical shows on my Dish Remote Access app but I think NY Med has earned themselves the number one spot on my list.

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