Santorum challenges Romney for the GOP pulpit, while who's funding Santorum?

FLORENCE, Ore. -- Rick Santorum says he has a strong faith, and often speaks in Biblical terms; yet this former Republican senator -- who’s now challenging Mitt Romney for the role of “preacher president” – is reported to be getting millions in corporate funding.

Republican voters here in the somewhat conservative retirement community of Florence are getting an earful from volunteers at the local library who are asking for “Fair Elections: Not Corporate Millions,” with Florence Republican Tony Creighton asking “where is Santorum suddenly getting his campaign millions from?” While another voter named Anders asks: “Why do Republicans mix religion and politics when we’re supposed to have a wall of separation between church and politics?” In fact, the GOP presidential contenders surly know that it was Thomas Jefferson who coined the phrase “separation of church and state,” so politicians would not evoke “the Lord,” or other religious beliefs when campaigning for office. In turn, the British media is calling Santorum “the mystery man” while featuring photos of Santorum behind a pulpit in church, with the headline: “He has a strong faith and often speaks in Biblical terms.”

Also, Republican Tony Creighton noted in a Huliq interview Jan. 5 that, “tenacity and honesty always marked the old-school Log Cabin Republicans I admire. Why is a smart man like Santorum not sensitive to concerns over mixing his religious views with his politics? That just bugs me a lot.”

In brief, Santorum represents the socially conservative wing of the Republican Party that likes to mix religion with politics; yet offers little if no empathy or compassion for the 60 million Americans who are poor and living rough, such as those here in Oregon where the state leads the nation in both unemployed and homeless.

Santorum preaches his word of God

This 53-year-old former senator from Pennsylvania – whose official biography lists him as Catholic -- is credited by conservative religious factions as “one of intelligent design’s most vocal supporters on Capitol Hill.”

For example, the “Santorum Amendment,” – that was a proposed amendment to the 2001 education funding bill, and became known as the “No Child Left Behind Act” – was backed by then-Republican Senator Santorum to “promote the teaching of intelligent design while questioning the academic standing of evolution in U.S. public schools, states the congressional record.

In layman’s terms, the Santorum Amendment attempted to edit out science in school text books in favor of a religious view of creation; while Democrats opposed the amendment because it cross the line in the “separation of church and state.”

Santorum has “strong faith” in what?

While Santorum is proud of his “strong faith,” and sharing the “word” by citing Biblical terms, political analysts in Europe and elsewhere think it’s “fine and dandy,” but what has Santorum done for the poor and needy that are always mentioned in the Bible, ask critics of this politician mixing religion with his ambitions to become the next president.

Moreover, Santorum’s style of mixing his religious views with politics has upset a lot of voters; with the website uncyclopedia even calling his the “Republican Jesus.”

Again, while it’s nice that Santorum evokes Jesus; there’s a famous line from Woody Allen who said “If Jesus came back and looked at what people are doing in his name, he would throw up.”

Also, the BBC World News provided those in Canada and Europe with an overview of Santorum Jan. 4 with the observation that he’s “a staunchly conservative politician. Along the way, he has provoked criticism for his strong opposition to gay rights. In 2005, Time magazine named the father of seven as one of America's 25 most influential evangelicals. But a year later, he lost his seat in Congress by a huge margin, but he said his defeat was part of the national backlash post-Iraq and not a reflection on his own service. Since then, he has been practicing law and preparing for a presidential run.”

Santorum and Romney promote their faith

It’s also no secret that Santorum’s arch rival -- right now after the Iowa causes – is another Republican who also touts being a religious man.

In fact, Mitt Romney is a “sixth-generation member” of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Romney’s official biography states that he is “descended from a genealogically interconnected political family sometimes known as the Pratt-Romneys.”

In turn, both the Pratt-Romneys and other strict Mormons believe that – according to page 289 in the “Journal of Discourses” that “No man or woman in this dispensation will ever enter into the celestial kingdom of God without the consent of Joseph Smith,” who is believed to have had “27 wives beside Emma Smith.”

Romney is a religious role-model for Santorum

Romney, 64, is believed to have never had an alcohol or caffeine beverage; while also not allowing a cigarette to be smoked by his lips or to even say a discouraging word as part of the core beliefs of his Mormon religion that’s now the fourth largest religious denomination in America.

During Romney’s college days, his official biography boasts that “he kept a well-groomed appearance” while in college during the Sixties when, of course, he never smoked pot, drank beer or partied with others.

In turn, Romney is credited with “many converts” with the “nominally Catholic, wine-loving French people” that were part of this Mormon French Mission that he attended to for “30 months” in the late Sixties.

Also, Romney’s official biography notes that “he was promoted to zone leader in Bordeaux (one of the most famous wine growing regions in the world) in early 1968; while then in the spring of that year became assistant to the mission president in Paris, the highest position for a missionary,” even while resisting the evils of wine and other spirits that are plentiful in this part of the world.

Of course, Romney had to miss out on fighting in Vietnam that was going on at this time.

However, in June 1968, “an automobile Romney was driving in southern France was hit by another vehicle, seriously injuring him and killing one of his passengers who turned out to be the wife of the mission president.”

How Santorum and Romney’s faith guides their actions

Because of Santorum’s deep religious faith, he’s gone on record as saying he would push for a constitutional amendment “barring same-sex marriage.” Also, when he was a senator from Pennsylvania, Santorum was “a prominent anti-abortion voice,” state congressional records that also has this GOP front-runner saying he would “take out” Iran’s nuclear capability “before the next explosion we hear in Iran is a nuclear one and then the world changes"

In turn, Romney also is looking for a war with Iran, with BBC World News reporting how this Mormon preacher -- who did not serve during the Vietnam War, but served instead as a Mormon missionary in and around Paris during the Sixties – “would take military action” against Iran, because Romney said: “It is unacceptable for Iran to have a nuclear weapon.”

Of course, as a Mormon missionary, Romney also said he would: “defend a US law barring federal recognition of same-sex marriages; supports allowing states to ban abortion.”

While Mormons’ also have a long and checkered history with human relationships – such as plural marriages – Mormon senior missionaries such as Romney will, say critics, use the “bully pulpit of the presidency” to help share the good word of his religion that demands strict adherence to no drinking, no smoking, no sex outside of marriage and belief that Jesus appeared to their spiritual leader; as explained in the Book of Mormon.

Santorum getting big campaign bucks

Because Romney “has a multi-million-dollar campaigning machine,” reports BBC News, and “Santorum’s organization is being run on a comparative shoestring,” political analysts believe Santorum may have to make a “deal with the devil,” to get up there with Romney in the hundreds of millions to spend (or waste) on a campaign to beat President Obama.

Moreover, BBC News reported recently that “money and support could be coming in,” and “he (Santorum) already has the endorsement of Rupert Murdoch,” who is now viewed in Britain as a sort of anti-Christ due to Murdoch admitting that his media empire spied on people to sell more newspapers and magazines.

Also, NBC News broke a story Jan. 4 that “a wealthy Wyoming financier and conservative philanthropist confirmed today that he is one of the principal backers of a new Super PAC that spent more than $530,000 on TV ads in Iowa supporting Rick Santorum and figures to play prominently in South Carolina and elsewhere.”

Foster Freiss, the founder of a hugely successful mutual investment fund, told NBC News that he is "one of a number of contributors who have rallied" to the Red, White and Blue Fund, the new super pac supporting Santorum.

“If I put up a million bucks, it doesn’t' compare...to the kind of commitment" the country's Founding Fathers made or American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan make, Freiss said.

NBC News also reported how “Freiss' funding of the Red, White and Blue Fund, which has not yet been publicly disclosed, is the latest example of how wealthy donors are pouring funds into Super PACs to influence the presidential election.”

Freiss, who is based in Jackson Hole, Wyo., is the founder of an investment fund called Freiss Associates, which includes on its website a quote from a Business Week article touting him as "the longest surviving successful growth stock picker."

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
We DON"T need religious fanatacism in the Oval Office. We need strong leadership, a recovering economy and end to corporate greed...not your biblical tongues. I'm a Christian,too. Church and State are seperate...If either of these 2 morons get in- then I'll say "GOD HELP US"!!!!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
This article has a lot of inaccuracies. The real story is here evolutionnews org /2012/01 /media_promoting055531 html (add the dots back in.;..dang spam filters)

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