Breaking Amish: Reports surfacing that parts of show could be fake

Breaking Amish has been one of the more entertaining shows on TLC recently, but is it real?

Are fans being deceived by the cast of Breaking Amish on TLC?

The channel’s latest reality show hit, Breaking Amish, may not be all it appears to be on the surface. The premise of the show is that five young people who have never been out in the world before, four Amish and one Mennonite, take off from their homes to learn about the world and chase their dreams. It is not the traditional rumspringa event, where young Amish leave for a period of time to be sure that they want to make the life-long commitment to the Amish way of life. No, this is supposed to be a clean break with the Amish and Mennonite communities for these people, and the start of a completely new way of life.

But, is that what it is?

Accusations are coming hard and fast from various sources that the show is, in fact, fake. The Hollywood Reporter indicated in a recent article that, “Photos culled from Facebook and MySpace pages purport that cast members have actually married, had children and divorced since entering mainstream society.” They do not, however, provide a link to the Facebook or MySpace pages. Additionally, The New York Daily News, reported that some members of the cast had misrepresented themselves to producers:

The makers of “Breaking Amish” are probing how at least one member of the hot TLC reality show’s cast — supposedly fresh-faced Amish and Mennonites who had never been exposed to the outside world — hid the fact that this person had already lived outside the closed community, got married, had children and was divorced.

A source close to the show told The News that as filming went on, it became clear that this cast member, and possibly another one, had misrepresented themselves.

Additionally, The New York Daily News also provided the following statement from TLC:

There is a lot of information floating around about the group featured on Breaking Amish. Much of it is not true, but some of it is — and is addressed in upcoming episodes.

So, should fans be patient and trust that the producers of the show and TLC had the best of intentions when they made Breaking Amish? Well, that will be up to fans to decide, and they have plenty of time left to come up with a verdict. There are 10 episodes scheduled to air this season, and only two have aired thus far.

Stay tuned.

Breaking Amish airs on TLC on Sunday nights at 10/9c.

Would you like to read more about Breaking Amish? Search "Breaking Amish" right here on Huliq!

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Image: TLC

Comments

Submitted by Janice (not verified) on
I was just wondering where the 5 people got their money from? They have spent a lot in Plane tickets, rooms, food, clothing, cabs etc. Just wondering where they all got the money

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
I know I spent alot of time in Pennsylvania and there are what we call ( swap meets) but for crafting/ handmade quilts other items, canning type foods and fresh farm items etc where the Amish / Mennonite sale their stuff so I have to assume that is where they get the money ( FYI Amish quilts are pricey but well worth it they are amazing) Even the Amish need money that being said it is not what everyone may think when hearing that so before commenting understand They do live very much as they always have at least I know the Amish do as far as the Mennonite they do have more modern day luxuries but still not top the extent that we have far from it.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
near my house in mantua nj, we have an Amish market where the Amish that live in Lancaster pa and such places are bused down here on the weekends and sell their products like meats, cheeses, & produce. its a very popular place, im sure there are many other plces like this, so im assuming this is where they make all their cash.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
I was wondering the same thing. New York is not cheap, and they don't seem to be in a hurry to leave the hotel for cheaper accommodations like an apartment. I can only assume that TLC is funding the plane tickets, hotel, food, etc., in which case it makes the content even more scripted and less believable. Sure, lets go try out a different lifestyle on someones dime!

Submitted by Janice (not verified) on
It must be TLC cause there is no way they have made that much money from selling things. Weird how they all seem to have money so that must be it. I don't care if it is fake or not cause a lot of it is the way they live. The Amish and Mennonite are out and about and they have learned the language from that. Some kids go to regular school but most are home schooled or go to their own schools. These people are very hard working people and they do shop in towns near them

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Show is 100 percent fake theses guys left there Communities years ago. Fake driving lessons The guy says he has driven before? Why would An Amish driven a car before? Other websites have proof of cast members being Married divorced some are even ex cons What a bunch of fake bs!!! All scripted to boost ratings controversy is helping Them

Submitted by Kacey (not verified) on
I believe that TLC is probably paying for their hotel and spending money. I looked up that hotel they are staying in in Manhattan and the cheapest room per night is just under $400.00. The only one of the cast members I have seen looking for and getting work is Sabrina...and even then I believe it to be fake. She had no experience and could not speak Spanish, how she got that job is beyond me!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
will still watch love this show, it is even more interesting now. It's "reality " t.v. reality in tv land does not truly mean real people... is it my world of reality, your world of reality or studio/ tv production reality? all created for entertainment So i say continue on for those who feel they were lied to for feel betrayed, duped whatever the case may be in all honesty and "Reality" your just upset because you did not understand the difference. Happy watching... :)

Submitted by Suzy Staley (not verified) on
I suspected there was more to the story as soon as I heard these "sheltered" young adults using foul language and slang like skanks in the early episodes. Seriously?!?

Submitted by Suzy Staley (not verified) on
I suspected there was more to the story as soon as I heard these "sheltered" young adults using foul language and slang like skanks in the early episodes. Seriously?!?

Submitted by Gina Caridi (not verified) on
Greetings, I live in PA very close to the Amish heartland and have known them for many years. I tuned in to the show a few times and have many reservations. Although, I do understand the concept, too many circumstances are questionable...............In all due respect, I have never seen those types of Amish people, that doesn't mean they don't exist, just not in my experiences.

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