Diggers uncovers the thrill of metal detecting for NatGeo viewers

It's the thrill of the hunt and the uncovering of history that keeps metal detector enthusiasts KG and Ringy going on this new National Geographic Channel series, but the dream of striking it big never fades.

National Geographic Channel viewers who dream of finding treasure may discover exactly what they are seeking with the new citizen science series, Diggers.

Diggers will premiere on the NatGeo Channel on New Year’s Day, with back-to-back episodes, featuring vocational metal detector enthusiasts and amateur historians George “KG” Wyant and Tim “Ringy” Saylor.

Wyant and Saylor will travel the country on Diggers, scouring the U.S. for lost pieces of history, everything from bullets at historic battlegrounds to family heirloom rings and silver coins. Where there is an empty yard, field or beach approved for metal detecting, the duo sees a treasure trove, and will go the distance to uncover “the juice” or “sweet nectar” as they call it, working in close collaboration with a local archaeologist or historian at every site. And, as the following clip demonstrates, one man's ruins is KG and Ringy's treasure:

The premiere season of Diggers features such diverse locations and stories as:

  • West Virginia Mine Wars: Blair Mountain is under consideration for surface coal mining and the team is eager to recover artifacts before they’re gone forever. With the help of an archaeologist, the guys discover a machine gun nest used against striking miners during the Battle of Blair Mountain.
  • Hardy, Ky., Family Feud: The team uncovers evidence of what happened the night of the infamous Hatfield raid on the McCoys.
  • Revolution at Cedar Ridge Tavern in N.J.: A small hail of bullets found by the team point to the actual site of what’s considered the last skirmish of the Revolutionary War.
  • New Orleans Gold Digger: The discovery of an 1853 U.S. gold dollar coin in the yard of an historic New Orleans home tells a wild story.

Thrill of the Hunt

While Wyant and Saylor’s finds typically have little monetary value, they are just as typically rich with history. “It’s the thrill of the hunt,” Saylor cheerfully admits of the treasure they find. “We don't make money detecting, but rather lose it. By the time you pay for gas, food, batteries and gear for the hunt, you almost always lose money that day.”

But, that doesn’t mean they do not dream. They are relentless searchers, spending long days in the field and digging countless holes to find a few humble treasures, while dreaming of the rare gold coins they someday hope to stumble upon.

Diggers speaks to the idea of citizen science coupled with expert analysis that is at the very heart of National Geographic Society’s mission of exploration,” added David Lyle, CEO of National Geographic Channels. “To produce the series, we worked hand in hand with members of the archaeology and historical community to ensure we had metal detector protocols in place so if we happened to uncover an important piece of history, its authenticity could be ensured and shared with the world.”

Diggers is scheduled to premiere on National Geographic Channel on Tuesday, January 1, with back-to-back episodes at 10 and 10:30 p.m. E/P.

UPDATED: Have fun with exercise through metal detecting!

Image: National Geographic Channel

Video: National Geographic Channel/Diggers

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
This new show is so stupid what are you guys doing trying to insult us.I got so fed up with it just had to find you guys on here and let you know this show is not for us, and we just went out and bought us both a new metal detector.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Great Show with actual finds. Yes they get a little crazy, but we all need a good laugh on occasion. Metal detecting is a fabulous hobby that gets you outdoors, breathing and moving. Better than sitting on the couch playing with computer. Keep these 2 guys on here and I'll keep getting more friends to watch it. As soon as the weather gets better, I'll be in the field with my own metal detector and getting some fresh air, excercise and maybe find an old token or ring. WTG NatGeo...+++

Great point on the exercise; if nothing else, most of us could benefit, as you said, from the time out from behind our keyboards!