Noodle burgers: Ramen and Spaghetti burgers, anyone?

Norman Byrd's picture

Not only are people using their noodle to invent new food items, they're using noodles in new food items. The Ramen Burger just hit the U. S. in L. A. and the Spaghetti Burger has launched in Philadelphia.

We love noodles. Yes, we do. Spaghetti is believed to have been invented by the Sicilians in the 12th century. Softer forms of noodles have been an Asian staple for centuries as well. The modern instant noodle form was invented in the late 1950s by Nissin Foods of Japan.

But the idea to pair the ubiquitous hamburger pattie with noodles somewhat recently has caught on and the fad appears to be transforming into something a bit more than just a passing trend -- although that remains to be seen. Creator and Chef Keizo Shimamoto debuted the Ramen Burger in New York (he used to make them as a chef in Tokyo) in early August and saw its debut in Torrance, Calif., this weekend, according to Foodbeast.com.

Just what is a Ramen Burger? Well, apparently, besides being delicious, it is an Angus beef pattie soaked in a "secret" shoyu sauce topped with scallions, arugula, and bracketed by buns made out of Ramen noodle cakes, which are cooked to edible consistency but crisped on the outer edges for gripping.

(Related: Burger King's new French Fry Burger: Just plain lazy product development)

And as the Ramen Burger takes hold of the imagination of the foodie adventurer in New York and the L. A. area, a more traditional noodle burger has debuted in Philadelphia. But it debuted in the most non-traditional of burger places, PYT, the self-described "home of the craziest burgers in America." Along with such bold creations as the Korean BBQ Short Rib Burger, the Krispy Kreme Sliders (with Chocolate Dipped Bacon), the Loaded Potato Skin Burger, the Bruschetta Burger, the Shrimp & Grits Burger, and the Cheesesteak Pretzel Roll Burger, PYT has added the Spaghetti Burger.

The PYT Spaghetti Burger is a mozzarella-stuffed meatball pattie drenched in marinara sauce and parmesan flakes. Its "buns" are molded baked garlic spaghetti.

Eastern ingenuity meets western ingenuity...

Noodles -- they're not just for starving students or massive family get-togethers anymore. No, it would appear that the common noodle has graduated to the esoteric and chic. But perhaps we should have seen this coming when they rolled out the FleurBurger 5000 in Las Vegas. The burger costs $5000 (at least they're up-front about the price -- it's in the name), according to MostExpensive.com, and is Kobe beef topped with foie gras, truffles and a truffle sauce, sandwiched between truffle buns. This most expensive burger comes with a bottle of imported Italian wine with accompanying glassware -- at no extra charge.

(Related: Dogs are in the hunt for truffles: Pigs no longer the go-to detector)

(photo credit: Zagat, Keizo Shimamoto, promotional use)